AzureFunctions.Autofac 2.1.0

Autofac Implementation of DI for Azure Functions

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See the version list below for details.
Install-Package AzureFunctions.Autofac -Version 2.1.0
dotnet add package AzureFunctions.Autofac --version 2.1.0
<PackageReference Include="AzureFunctions.Autofac" Version="2.1.0" />
For projects that support PackageReference, copy this XML node into the project file to reference the package.
paket add AzureFunctions.Autofac --version 2.1.0
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Autofac Dependency Injection in Azure Functions

An Autofac based implementation of Dependency Injection based on Boris Wilhelm's azure-function-dependency-injection and Scott Holden's WebJobs.ContextResolver available on NuGet as AzureFunctions.Autofac

Usage

In order to implement the dependency injection you have to create a class to configure DependencyInjection and add an attribute on your function class.

Configuration

Create a class and call the DependencyInjection.Initialize method. Perform the registrations as you normally would with Autofac.

    public class DIConfig
    {
        public DIConfig()
        {
            DependencyInjection.Initialize(builder =>
            {
                //Implicity registration
                builder.RegisterType<Sample>().As<ISample>();
                //Explicit registration
                builder.Register<Example>(c => new Example(c.Resolve<ISample>())).As<IExample>();
                //Registration by autofac module
                builder.RegisterModule(new TestModule());
                //Named Instances are supported
                builder.RegisterType<Thing1>().Named<IThing>("OptionA");
                builder.RegisterType<Thing2>().Named<IThing>("OptionB");
            });
        }
    }

Function Attribute and Inject Attribute

Once you have created your config class you need to annotate your function class indicating which config to use and annotate any parameters that are being injected. Note: All injected parameters must be registered with the autofac container in your resolver in order for this to work.

    [DependencyInjectionConfig(typeof(DIConfig))]
    public class GreeterFunction
    {
        [FunctionName("GreeterFunction")]
        public static HttpResponseMessage Run([HttpTrigger(AuthorizationLevel.Function, "get", Route = null)]HttpRequestMessage request, 
                                              TraceWriter log, 
                                              [Inject]IGreeter greeter, 
                                              [Inject]IGoodbyer goodbye)
        {
            log.Info("C# HTTP trigger function processed a request.");
            return request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, $"{greeter.Greet()} {goodbye.Goodbye()}");
        }
    }

Using Named Dependencies

Support has been added to use named dependencies. Simple add a name parameter to the Inject attribute to specify which instance to use.

    [DependencyInjectionConfig(typeof(DIConfig))]
    public class GreeterFunction
    {
        [FunctionName("GreeterFunction")]
        public static HttpResponseMessage Run([HttpTrigger(AuthorizationLevel.Function, "get", Route = null)]HttpRequestMessage request, 
                                              TraceWriter log, 
                                              [Inject]IGreeter greeter, 
                                              [Inject("Main")]IGoodbyer goodbye, 
                                              [Inject("Secondary")]IGoodbyer alternateGoodbye)
        {
            log.Info("C# HTTP trigger function processed a request.");
            return request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, $"{greeter.Greet()} {goodbye.Goodbye()} or {alternateGoodbye.Goodbye()}");
        }
    }

Autofac Dependency Injection in Azure Functions

An Autofac based implementation of Dependency Injection based on Boris Wilhelm's azure-function-dependency-injection and Scott Holden's WebJobs.ContextResolver available on NuGet as AzureFunctions.Autofac

Usage

In order to implement the dependency injection you have to create a class to configure DependencyInjection and add an attribute on your function class.

Configuration

Create a class and call the DependencyInjection.Initialize method. Perform the registrations as you normally would with Autofac.

    public class DIConfig
    {
        public DIConfig()
        {
            DependencyInjection.Initialize(builder =>
            {
                //Implicity registration
                builder.RegisterType<Sample>().As<ISample>();
                //Explicit registration
                builder.Register<Example>(c => new Example(c.Resolve<ISample>())).As<IExample>();
                //Registration by autofac module
                builder.RegisterModule(new TestModule());
                //Named Instances are supported
                builder.RegisterType<Thing1>().Named<IThing>("OptionA");
                builder.RegisterType<Thing2>().Named<IThing>("OptionB");
            });
        }
    }

Function Attribute and Inject Attribute

Once you have created your config class you need to annotate your function class indicating which config to use and annotate any parameters that are being injected. Note: All injected parameters must be registered with the autofac container in your resolver in order for this to work.

    [DependencyInjectionConfig(typeof(DIConfig))]
    public class GreeterFunction
    {
        [FunctionName("GreeterFunction")]
        public static HttpResponseMessage Run([HttpTrigger(AuthorizationLevel.Function, "get", Route = null)]HttpRequestMessage request, 
                                              TraceWriter log, 
                                              [Inject]IGreeter greeter, 
                                              [Inject]IGoodbyer goodbye)
        {
            log.Info("C# HTTP trigger function processed a request.");
            return request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, $"{greeter.Greet()} {goodbye.Goodbye()}");
        }
    }

Using Named Dependencies

Support has been added to use named dependencies. Simple add a name parameter to the Inject attribute to specify which instance to use.

    [DependencyInjectionConfig(typeof(DIConfig))]
    public class GreeterFunction
    {
        [FunctionName("GreeterFunction")]
        public static HttpResponseMessage Run([HttpTrigger(AuthorizationLevel.Function, "get", Route = null)]HttpRequestMessage request, 
                                              TraceWriter log, 
                                              [Inject]IGreeter greeter, 
                                              [Inject("Main")]IGoodbyer goodbye, 
                                              [Inject("Secondary")]IGoodbyer alternateGoodbye)
        {
            log.Info("C# HTTP trigger function processed a request.");
            return request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, $"{greeter.Greet()} {goodbye.Goodbye()} or {alternateGoodbye.Goodbye()}");
        }
    }

Release Notes

Updated packages to work with latest Azure Functions

GitHub repositories (0)

This package is not used by any popular GitHub repositories.

Version History

Version Downloads Last updated
4.0.0 10,029 4/2/2020
4.0.0-alpha 358 3/8/2020
3.2.0.1-alpha 153 2/17/2020
3.2.0 11,469 2/18/2020
3.2.0-alpha 145 2/17/2020
3.1.0 4,277 1/22/2020
3.0.7 122,888 4/22/2019
3.0.6 131,756 11/5/2018
3.0.5 26,559 9/18/2018
3.0.4 6,835 8/31/2018
3.0.4-beta1 538 8/31/2018
3.0.3 1,603 8/26/2018
3.0.2 3,171 8/3/2018
3.0.2-beta04 252 8/1/2018
3.0.2-beta03 251 8/1/2018
3.0.2-beta02 262 8/1/2018
3.0.2-beta 248 8/1/2018
3.0.1 4,934 6/19/2018
3.0.0 9,011 6/10/2018
2.1.0 23,047 4/6/2018
2.0.0 9,347 11/3/2017
1.1.0 407 10/28/2017
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