Amazon.Lambda.Annotations 1.4.0

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dotnet add package Amazon.Lambda.Annotations --version 1.4.0
NuGet\Install-Package Amazon.Lambda.Annotations -Version 1.4.0
This command is intended to be used within the Package Manager Console in Visual Studio, as it uses the NuGet module's version of Install-Package.
<PackageReference Include="Amazon.Lambda.Annotations" Version="1.4.0" />
For projects that support PackageReference, copy this XML node into the project file to reference the package.
paket add Amazon.Lambda.Annotations --version 1.4.0
#r "nuget: Amazon.Lambda.Annotations, 1.4.0"
#r directive can be used in F# Interactive and Polyglot Notebooks. Copy this into the interactive tool or source code of the script to reference the package.
// Install Amazon.Lambda.Annotations as a Cake Addin
#addin nuget:?package=Amazon.Lambda.Annotations&version=1.4.0

// Install Amazon.Lambda.Annotations as a Cake Tool
#tool nuget:?package=Amazon.Lambda.Annotations&version=1.4.0

Amazon.Lambda.Annotations

Lambda Annotations is a programming model for writing .NET Lambda functions. At a high level the programming model allows idiomatic .NET coding patterns. C# Source Generators are used to bridge the gap between the Lambda programming model to the Lambda Annotations programming model without adding any performance penalty.

Topics:

How does Lambda Annotations work?

The default experience for writing .NET Lambda functions is to write a .NET method that takes in an event object. From there boiler plate code is written to parse the data out of the event object and synchronize the CloudFormation template to define the Lambda function and the .NET method to call for each event. Here is a simplistic example of a .NET Lambda function that acts like a calculator plus method using the default Lambda programming model. It responds to an API Gateway REST API, pulls the operands from the resource paths, does the addition and returns back an API Gateway response.

public class Functions
{
    public APIGatewayProxyResponse LambdaMathPlus(APIGatewayProxyRequest request, ILambdaContext context)
    {
        if (!request.PathParameters.TryGetValue("x", out var xs))
        {
            return new APIGatewayProxyResponse
            {
                StatusCode = (int)HttpStatusCode.BadRequest
            };
        }
        if (!request.PathParameters.TryGetValue("y", out var ys))
        {
            return new APIGatewayProxyResponse
            {
                StatusCode = (int)HttpStatusCode.BadRequest
            };
        }

        var x = int.Parse(xs);
        var y = int.Parse(ys);

        return new APIGatewayProxyResponse
        {
            StatusCode = (int)HttpStatusCode.OK,
            Body = (x + y).ToString(),
            Headers = new Dictionary<string, string> { { "Content-Type", "text/plain" } }
        };
    } 
}

Using Lambda Annotations the same Lambda function can remove a lot of that boiler plate code and write the method like this.

public class Functions
{
    [LambdaFunction]
    [RestApi("/plus/{x}/{y}")]
    public int Plus(int x, int y)
    {
        return x + y;
    }
}

Lambda Annotations uses C# source generators to generate that boiler plate code to bridge the gap between the default Lambda programming model to Lambda Annotations programming model at compile time. In addition the source generator also synchronizes the CloudFormation template to declare all of the .NET methods with the LambdaFunction attribute as Lambda functions in the CloudFormation template.

Getting started

To get started with Lambda annotations a Lambda blueprint is available. For Visual Studio users the blueprint can be accessed using the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio. For non-Visual Studio users the Amazon.Lambda.Templates NuGet package is available for creating .NET Lambda projects from the .NET CLI.

Visual Studio 2022

To get started with Visual Studio install AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio extension. Once installed, a pre-configured Lambda Annotations project can be created using the following steps:

  • Select Create a new project
  • In the template search box enter AWS Serverless
  • Select the AWS Serverless Application (.NET Core C#) from the search result and click Next
  • Name the project and click Create
  • The Select Blueprint wizard will be displayed for choosing the initial content of the project.
  • Select the Annotations Framework blueprint and click Finish

.NET CLI

.NET Lambda projects can be be created using the .NET CLI's dotnet new command. To create a project using the Lambda Annotations library run the following steps from a terminal.

  • Run dotnet new install Amazon.Lambda.Templates to install the AWS Lambda templates into the .NET CLI
  • Run dotnet new serverless.Annotations --output FirstAnnotationsProject to create a project using Lambda Annotations

This will create a project in a sub directory of the current director called FirstAnnotationsProject. The directory will contain both a Lambda project using Annotations as well as a unit test project.

The sample project

The sample project contains the following files:

  • Functions.cs - Defines a collection of REST API Lambda functions using Lambda Annotation.
  • Startup.cs - Where services can be registered for dependency injection into the Lambda functions.
  • serverless.template - CloudFormation template used to deploy the Lambda functions. The Lambda Annotations library will automatically sync the functions defined in the project in the CloudFormation template.
  • aws-lambda-tools-defaults.json - Config file for default settings used for deployment.

To reset to an empty project delete the code in the Functions class and recompile the project. The Lambda Annotations library will remove all of the Lambda function declarations from the CloudFormation template. If the project will not include any Lambda functions that use API Gateway's HTTP API event sources then the ApiURL output parameter should be manually removed from the CloudFormation template.

Deployment

The Lambda Annotations library requires no special tooling for deployment. Any tool that supports CloudFormation-based .NET Lambda function deployment is compatible with Lambda Annotations. This includes AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio, Amazon.Lambda.Tools for the .NET CLI and AWS SAM CLI.

For the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio deployment can be initiated by right clicking on the Lambda project in the Solution Explorer and selecting Publish to AWS Lambda.... This will launch a wizard to configure the name of the CloudFormation stack and a S3 bucket used for storage of the compiled Lambda function deployment bundles.

Amazon.Lambda.Tools is a .NET CLI global tool that can be install using the command dotnet tool install --global Amazon.Lambda.Tools. Once installed deployment can be initiated by running the command dotnet lambda deploy-serverless in the directory of the Lambda project.

Adding Lambda Annotations to an existing project

Lambda Annotations can be added to existing projects. Lambda Annotations does require that deployment of existing projects is done using a CloudFormation template. In the future Lambda Annotations may support other deployment technologies.

To get started with Lambda Annotations in existing projects add a reference to the Amazon.Lambda.Annotations NuGet package. Then decorate C# methods that should be exposed as Lambda Functions with the LambdaFunction attribute. If the LambdaFunction attribute is added to a method that was already declared in the CloudFormation template the original declaration should be manually removed.

Dependency Injection integration

Lambda Annotations supports dependency injection. A class can be marked with a LambdaStartup attribute. The class will have a ConfigureServices method for configuring services.

The services can be injected by either constructor injection or using the FromServices attribute on a method parameter of the function decorated with the LambdaFunction attribute.

Services injected via the constructor have a lifecycle for the length of the Lambda compute container. For each Lambda invocation a scope is created and the services injected using the FromServices attribute are created within the scope.

Example startup class:

[LambdaStartup]
public class Startup
{
    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddAWSService<Amazon.S3.IAmazonS3>();
        services.AddScoped<ITracker, DefaultTracker>();
    }
}

Example function using DI:

public class Functions
{
    IAmazonS3 _s3Client;

    public Functions(IAmazonS3 s3Client)
    {
        _s3Client = s3Client;
    }


    [LambdaFunction]
    [HttpApi(LambdaHttpMethod.Put, "/process/{name}")]
    public async Task Process([FromServices] ITracker tracker, string name, [FromBody] string data)
    {
        tracker.Record();

        await _s3Client.PutObjectAsync(new PutObjectRequest
        {
            BucketName = "storage-bucket",
            Key = name,
            ContentBody = data
        });
    }
}

Synchronizing CloudFormation template

When the .NET project is compiled the Lambda Annotation source generator will synchronize all of the C# methods with the LambdaFunction attribute in the project's CloudFormation template. Support is available for both JSON and YAML based CloudFormation templates. The source generator identifies the CloudFormation template for the project by looking at the template property in the aws-lambda-tools-defaults.json file. If the template property is absent, the source generator will default to serverless.template and create the file if it does not exist.

The source generator synchronizes Lambda resources in the CloudFormation template. The template can still be edited to add additional AWS resources or to further customize the Lambda functions, such as adding other event sources that are not currently supported by Lambda Annotations attributes.

When a .NET Method is synchronized to the CloudFormation template the source generator adds the Tool metadata property shown below. This metadata links the CloudFormation resource to the source generator. If the LambdaFunction attribute is removed the C# method then the source generator will remove the CloudFormation resource. To unlink the CloudFormation resource from the source generator remove the Tool metadata property.


  ...

"CloudCalculatorFunctionsAddGenerated": {
    "Type": "AWS::Serverless::Function",
    "Metadata": {
        "Tool": "Amazon.Lambda.Annotations",
        "SyncedEvents": [
            "RootGet"
        ]
    },
    "Properties": {
    "Runtime": "dotnet6",
    "CodeUri": ".",

  ...
}

The LambdaFunction attribute contains properties that map to properties of the CloudFormation resource. For example in this snippet the Lambda function's MemorySize and Timeout properties are set in the C# code. The source generator will synchronize these properties into the CloudFormation template.

[LambdaFunction(MemorySize = 512, Timeout = 55)]
[HttpApi(LambdaHttpMethod.Get, "/add/{x}/{y}")]
public int Add(int x, int y, ILambdaContext context)
{
    context.Logger.LogInformation($"{x} plus {y} is {x + y}");
    return x + y;
}

Some CloudFormation properties are not set to a specific value but instead reference another resource or parameter defined in the CloudFormation template. To indicate the value for a property of the .NET attribute is meant to reference another CloudFormation resource prefix the value with @. Here is an example of the Role for the Lambda function to reference an IAM role defined in the CloudFormation template as LambdaRoleParameter

public class Functions
{
    [LambdaFunction( Role="@LambdaRoleParameter")]
    [RestApi("/plus/{x}/{y}")]
    public int Plus(int x, int y)
    {
        return x + y;
    }
}
    "CloudCalculatorFunctionsAddGenerated": {
      "Type": "AWS::Serverless::Function",
      "Metadata": {
        "Tool": "Amazon.Lambda.Annotations",
        "SyncedEvents": [
          "RootGet"
        ]
      },
      "Properties": {
        "Runtime": "dotnet6",

...
        "Role": {
          "Fn::GetAtt": [
            "LambdaRoleParameter",
            "Arn"
          ]
        }
      }
    },

By default, Lambda Annotations will update the CloudFormation template's description field to include the version of Lambda Annotations that was used to modify the template.

{
  "AWSTemplateFormatVersion": "2010-09-09",
  "Transform": "AWS::Serverless-2016-10-31",
  "Description": "An AWS Serverless Application. This template is partially managed by Amazon.Lambda.Annotations (v0.9.0.0).",
   ...

This description allow AWS to record the version and the usage of the Lambda Annotations framework in order to improve its quality. We record details at the CloudFormation stack level, and do not identify the application, library, or tool that was deployed. Note that we do not record any personal information, such as usernames, email addresses or sensitive project-level information.

If you do not want AWS to track the usage of the library, please set the following in your project (csproj) file:

<PropertyGroup>
  <AWSSuppressLambdaAnnotationsTelemetry>true</AWSSuppressLambdaAnnotationsTelemetry>
</PropertyGroup>

Lambda Global Properties

A LambdaGlobalProperties attribute is available to set global settings that the annotations framework uses when generating code at compile time. This simplifies the programming model when using custom runtimes or native ahead of time (AOT) compilation. It removes the need to manually bootstrap the Lambda runtime.

To auto-generate the static Main method, first ensure the OutputType in your csproj file is set to exe.

<PropertyGroup>
    
    <OutputType>exe</OutputType>
</PropertyGroup>

Once the output type is set to executable, add the LambdaGlobalProperties assembly attribute and set the GenerateMain property to true. If Runtime is not specified in the global attribute, Lambda Annotations will attempt to determine it from your project file. You can also configure the Runtime in the generated CloudFormation template.

To allow for multiple Lambda functions in the same executable an Environment Variable is used to determine which handler is executed. When using the GenerateMain attribute, ensure you also set the ANNOTATIONS_HANDLER environment variable on the deployed Lambda function.

The auto-generated CloudFormation template will include this as a default.

Amazon API Gateway example

This example creates a REST API through Amazon API Gateway that exposes the common arithmetic operations.

To avoid putting business logic inside the REST API a separate calculator service is created to encapsulate the logic of the arithmetic operations. Here is both the calculator service's interface and default implementation.

public interface ICalculatorService
{
    int Add(int x, int y);

    int Subtract(int x, int y);

    int Multiply(int x, int y);

    int Divide(int x, int y);
}

public class DefaultCalculatorService : ICalculatorService
{
    public int Add(int x, int y) => x + y;

    public int Subtract(int x, int y) => x - y;

    public int Multiply(int x, int y) => x * y;

    public int Divide(int x, int y) => x / y;
}

The startup class contains the LambdaStartup attribute identifying it as the class to configure the services registered in the dependency injection framework. Here the ICalculatorService is registered as a singleton service in the collection of services.

[LambdaStartup]
public class Startup
{

    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddSingleton<ICalculatorService, DefaultCalculatorService>();
    }
}

Since the ICalculatorService is registered as a singleton the service is injected into the Lambda function via the constructor. If the registered service is registered as scoped or transient and a new instance is needed for each Lambda invocation then the FromServices attribute should be used on a method parameter of the Lambda function.

public class Functions
{
    ICalculatorService _calculatorService;
    public Functions(ICalculatorService calculatorService)
    {
        _calculatorService = calculatorService;
    }

    ...

For each arithmetic operation a separate C# method is added containing the LambdaFunction attribute. The LambdaFunction attribute ensures the dependency injection framework is hooked up to the Lambda function and the Lambda function will be declared in the CloudFormation template.

Since these Lambda functions are responding to API Gateway events the HttpApi attribute is added to register the event source in CloudFormation along with the HTTP verb and resource path. The HttpApi attribute also enables mapping of the HTTP request components to method parameters. In this case the operands used for the arithmetic operations are mapped from the resource path. Checkout the list of Lambda attributes in the reference section to see how to map other components of the HTTP request to method parameters.

[LambdaFunction()]
[HttpApi(LambdaHttpMethod.Get, "/add/{x}/{y}")]
public int Add(int x, int y, ILambdaContext context)
{
    context.Logger.LogInformation($"{x} plus {y} is {x + y}");
    return _calculatorService.Add(x, y);
}

[LambdaFunction()]
[HttpApi(LambdaHttpMethod.Get, "/subtract/{x}/{y}")]
public int Subtract(int x, int y, ILambdaContext context)
{
    context.Logger.LogInformation($"{x} subtract {y} is {x - y}");
    return _calculatorService.Subtract(x, y);
}

[LambdaFunction()]
[HttpApi(LambdaHttpMethod.Get, "/multiply/{x}/{y}")]
public int Multiply(int x, int y, ILambdaContext context)
{
    context.Logger.LogInformation($"{x} multiply {y} is {x * y}");
    return _calculatorService.Multiply(x, y);
}

[LambdaFunction()]
[HttpApi(LambdaHttpMethod.Get, "/divide/{x}/{y}")]
public int Divide(int x, int y, ILambdaContext context)
{
    context.Logger.LogInformation($"{x} divide {y} is {x / y}");
    return _calculatorService.Divide(x, y);
}

For each LambdaFunction declared the source generator will update the CloudFormation template with the corresponding resource. The Lambda CloudFormation resource has the Handler property set to the generated method by Lambda Annotations. This generated method is where Lambda Annotations bridges the gap between the Lambda Annotation programming model and the Lambda programming model. The HttpApi attribute also adds the API Gateway event source.

    "CloudCalculatorFunctionsAddGenerated": {
      "Type": "AWS::Serverless::Function",
      "Metadata": {
        "Tool": "Amazon.Lambda.Annotations",
        "SyncedEvents": [
          "RootGet"
        ]
      },
      "Properties": {
        "Runtime": "dotnet6",
        "CodeUri": ".",
        "MemorySize": 256,
        "Timeout": 30,
        "PackageType": "Zip",
        "Handler": "CloudCalculator::CloudCalculator.Functions_Add_Generated::Add",
        "Events": {
          "RootGet": {
            "Type": "HttpApi",
            "Properties": {
              "Path": "/add/{x}/{y}",
              "Method": "GET",
              "PayloadFormatVersion": "2.0"
            }
          }
        }
      }
    },

Here is an example of the generated code from the source generator for the Add Lambda function. The generated code wraps around the C# method that has the LambdaFunction attribute. It takes care of configuring the dependency injection, gets the parameters from the API Gateway event and invokes the wrapped LambdaFunction. This code snippet is here for informational purposes, as a user of the Lambda Annotations framework this code should not be needed to be seen.

public class Functions_Add_Generated
{
    private readonly ServiceProvider serviceProvider;

    public Functions_Add_Generated()
    {
        var services = new ServiceCollection();

        // By default, Lambda function class is added to the service container using the singleton lifetime
        // To use a different lifetime, specify the lifetime in Startup.ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection) method.
        services.AddSingleton<Functions>();

        var startup = new CloudCalculator.Startup();
        startup.ConfigureServices(services);
        serviceProvider = services.BuildServiceProvider();
    }

    public Amazon.Lambda.APIGatewayEvents.APIGatewayHttpApiV2ProxyResponse Add(Amazon.Lambda.APIGatewayEvents.APIGatewayHttpApiV2ProxyRequest request, Amazon.Lambda.Core.ILambdaContext context)
    {
        // Create a scope for every request,
        // this allows creating scoped dependencies without creating a scope manually.
        using var scope = serviceProvider.CreateScope();
        var functions = scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<Functions>();

        var validationErrors = new List<string>();

        var x = default(int);
        if (request.PathParameters?.ContainsKey("x") == true)
        {
            try
            {
                x = (int)Convert.ChangeType(request.PathParameters["x"], typeof(int));
            }
            catch (Exception e) when (e is InvalidCastException || e is FormatException || e is OverflowException || e is ArgumentException)
            {
                validationErrors.Add($"Value {request.PathParameters["x"]} at 'x' failed to satisfy constraint: {e.Message}");
            }
        }

        var y = default(int);
        if (request.PathParameters?.ContainsKey("y") == true)
        {
            try
            {
                y = (int)Convert.ChangeType(request.PathParameters["y"], typeof(int));
            }
            catch (Exception e) when (e is InvalidCastException || e is FormatException || e is OverflowException || e is ArgumentException)
            {
                validationErrors.Add($"Value {request.PathParameters["y"]} at 'y' failed to satisfy constraint: {e.Message}");
            }
        }

        // return 400 Bad Request if there exists a validation error
        if (validationErrors.Any())
        {
            return new Amazon.Lambda.APIGatewayEvents.APIGatewayHttpApiV2ProxyResponse
            {
                Body = @$"{{""message"": ""{validationErrors.Count} validation error(s) detected: {string.Join(",", validationErrors)}""}}",
                Headers = new Dictionary<string, string>
                {
                    {"Content-Type", "application/json"},
                    {"x-amzn-ErrorType", "ValidationException"}
                },
                StatusCode = 400
            };
        }

        var response = functions.Add(x, y, context);

        var body = response.ToString();

        return new Amazon.Lambda.APIGatewayEvents.APIGatewayHttpApiV2ProxyResponse
        {
            Body = body,
            Headers = new Dictionary<string, string>
            {
                {"Content-Type", "application/json"}
            },
            StatusCode = 200
        };
    }
}

Amazon S3 example

Lambda functions that are not using API Gateway can take advantage of Lambda Annotation's dependency injection integration and CloudFormation synchronization features. This example is a Lambda function that responds to S3 events and resizes images that are uploaded to S3.

The Startup class is used to register the services needed for the function. Two services are registered in this example. First is the AWS SDK's S3 client. The second is the IImageServices to handle image manipulation. In this example the IImageService is registered as a transient service so we can have a new instance created for every invocation. This is commonly needed if a service has state that should not be preserved per invocation.

[LambdaStartup]
public class Startup
{
    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        // Using the AWSSDK.Extensions.NETCore.Setup package add the AWS SDK's S3 client
        services.AddAWSService<Amazon.S3.IAmazonS3>();

        // Add service for handling image manipulation. 
        // IImageServices is added as transient service so a new instance
        // is created for each Lambda invocation. This can be important if services
        // have state that should not be persisted per invocation.
        services.AddTransient<IImageServices, DefaultImageServices>();
    }
}

In the Lambda function the AWS SDK's S3 client is injected by the dependency injection framework via the constructor. The constructor is only ever called once per Lambda invocation so for the IImageServices which was registered as transient it would not make sense to inject that service via the constructor. Instead the IImageServices is injected as a method parameter using the FromServices attribute. That ensures each time the method is called a new instance of IImageServices is created.

On the Resize method the LambdaFunction attribute sets the MemorySize and Timeout properties for the Lambda function. The source generator will sync these values to the corresponding properties in the CloudFormation template. The Role property is also set but in this case the value is prefixed with a @. The @ tells the source generator to treat the value for a role as a reference to another element in the CloudFormation template. In this case the CloudFormation template defines an IAM role called LambdaResizeImageRole and the Lambda function should use that IAM role.

public class Functions
{
    private IAmazonS3 _s3Client;

    public Functions(IAmazonS3 s3Client)
    {
        _s3Client = s3Client;
    }

    [LambdaFunction(MemorySize = 1024, Timeout = 120, Role = "@LambdaResizeImageRole")]
    public async Task Resize([FromServices] IImageServices imageServices, S3Event evnt, ILambdaContext context)
    {
        var transferUtility = new TransferUtility(this._s3Client);

        foreach(var record in evnt.Records)
        {
            var tempFile = Path.GetTempFileName();

            // Download image from S3
            await transferUtility.DownloadAsync(tempFile, record.S3.Bucket.Name, record.S3.Object.Key);

            // Resize the image
            var resizeImagePath = await imageServices.ResizeImageAsync(imagePath: tempFile, width: 50, height: 50);

            // Upload resized image to S3 with a "/thumbnails" prefix in the object key.
            await transferUtility.UploadAsync(resizeImagePath, record.S3.Bucket.Name, "/thumbnails" + record.S3.Object.Key);
        }
    }
}

The source generator will create the Lambda function resource in the CloudFormation template. The source generator will sync the properties that were defined in the LambdaFunction attribute. The Lambda function resources synchronized in the template can also be modified directly in the template as well. In this example the function is modified to define the event source in this case to S3.

    "ImageResizerFunctionFunctionsResizeGenerated": {
      "Type": "AWS::Serverless::Function",
      "Metadata": {
        "Tool": "Amazon.Lambda.Annotations"
      },
      "Properties": {
        "Runtime": "dotnet6",
        "CodeUri": ".",
        "MemorySize": 1024,
        "Timeout": 120,
        "PackageType": "Zip",
        "Handler": "ImageResizerFunction::ImageResizerFunction.Functions_Resize_Generated::Resize",
        "Role": {
          "Fn::GetAtt": [
            "LambdaResizeImageRole",
            "Arn"
          ]
        },
        "Events": {
          "S3Objects": {
            "Type": "S3",
            "Properties": {
              "Bucket": {
                "Ref": "ImageBucket"
              },
              "Filter": {
                "S3Key": {
                  "Rules": [
                    {
                      "Name": "prefix",
                      "Value": "/images"
                    }
                  ]
                }
              },
              "Events": [
                "s3:ObjectCreated:*"
              ]
            }
          }
        }
      }
    },

This is the code the source generator will produce for this function. The constructor is handling setting up the dependency injection. During the generated Resize method a dependency injection scope is created and then the IImageServices is retrieved from the dependency injection and passed into the function written by the developer. By creating the scope in the generated Resize method all services registered as scoped or transient will trigger a new instance to be created when retrieved from the dependency injection framework. This code snippet is here for informational purposes, as a user of the Lambda Annotations framework this code should not be needed to be seen.

public class Functions_Resize_Generated
{
    private readonly ServiceProvider serviceProvider;

    public Functions_Resize_Generated()
    {
        var services = new ServiceCollection();

        // By default, Lambda function class is added to the service container using the singleton lifetime
        // To use a different lifetime, specify the lifetime in Startup.ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection) method.
        services.AddSingleton<Functions>();

        var startup = new ImageResizerFunction.Startup();
        startup.ConfigureServices(services);
        serviceProvider = services.BuildServiceProvider();
    }

    public async System.Threading.Tasks.Task Resize(Amazon.Lambda.S3Events.S3Event evnt, Amazon.Lambda.Core.ILambdaContext __context__)
    {
        // Create a scope for every request,
        // this allows creating scoped dependencies without creating a scope manually.
        using var scope = serviceProvider.CreateScope();
        var functions = scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<Functions>();

        var imageServices = scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<ImageResizerFunction.IImageServices>();
        await functions.Resize(imageServices, evnt, __context__);
    }
}

Getting build information

The source generator integrates with MSBuild's compiler error and warning reporting when there are problems generating the boiler plate code.

To see the code that is generated by the source generator turn the verbosity to detailed when executing a build. From the command this is done by using the --verbosity switch.

dotnet build --verbosity detailed

To change the verbosity in Visual Studio go to Tools → Options → Projects and Solutions and adjust the MSBuild verbosity drop down boxes.

Lambda .NET Attributes Reference

List of .NET attributes currently supported.

  • LambdaFunction
    • Placed on a method. Indicates this method should be exposed as a Lambda function.
  • LambdaStartup
    • Placed on a class. Indicates this type should be used as the startup class and is used to configure the dependency injection and middleware. There can only be one class in a Lambda project with this attribute.

Event Attributes

Event attributes configuring the source generator for the type of event to expect and setup the event source in the CloudFormation template. If an event attribute is not set the parameter to the LambdaFunction must be the event object and the event source must be configured outside of the code.

  • RestApi
    • Configures the Lambda function to be called from an API Gateway REST API. The HTTP method and resource path are required to be set on the attribute.
  • HttpApi
    • Configures the Lambda function to be called from an API Gateway HTTP API. The HTTP method, HTTP API payload version and resource path are required to be set on the attribute.

Parameter Attributes

  • FromHeader
    • Map method parameter to HTTP header value
  • FromQuery
    • Map method parameter to query string parameter
  • FromRoute
    • Map method parameter to resource path segment
  • FromBody
    • Map method parameter to HTTP request body. If parameter is a complex type then request body will be assumed to be JSON and deserialized into the type.
  • FromServices
    • Map method parameter to registered service in IServiceProvider

Customizing responses for API Gateway Lambda functions

The attributes RestApi or HttpApi configure a LambdaFunction method to use API Gateway as the event source for the function. By default these methods return an HTTP status code of 200. To customize the HTTP response, including adding HTTP headers, the method signature must return an Amazon.Lambda.Annotations.APIGateway.IHttpResult or Task<Amazon.Lambda.Annotations.APIGateway.IHttpResult>. The Amazon.Lambda.Annotations.APIGateway.HttpResults class contains static methods for creating an instance of IHttpResult with the appropriate HTTP status code and headers.

The example below shows how to return a HTTP status code 404 with a response body and custom header.

[LambdaFunction(PackageType = LambdaPackageType.Image)]
[HttpApi(LambdaHttpMethod.Get, "/resource/{id}")]
public IHttpResult NotFoundResponseWithHeaderV2(int id, ILambdaContext context)
{
    return HttpResults.NotFound($"Resource with id {id} could not be found")
                        .AddHeader("Custom-Header1", "Value1");
}

Available static methods for creating an instance of IHttpResult.

  • HttpResults.Accepted()
  • HttpResults.BadGateway()
  • HttpResults.BadRequest()
  • HttpResults.Conflict()
  • HttpResults.Created()
  • HttpResults.Forbid()
  • HttpResults.InternalServerError()
  • HttpResults.NotFound()
  • HttpResults.Ok()
  • HttpResults.Redirect()
  • HttpResults.ServiceUnavailable()
  • HttpResults.Unauthorized()
  • HttpResults.NewResult()
Content-Type

HttpResults will automatically assign a content-type for the response if there is a response body and content type was not specified using the AddHeader method. The content type is determined using the following rules.

  • Content type will be set to text/plain when the response body is a string.
  • Content type will be set to application/octet-stream when the response body is a Stream, byte[] or IList<byte>.
  • For any other response body the content type is set to application/json.

Project References

If API Gateway event attributes, such as RestAPI or HttpAPI, are being used then a package reference to Amazon.Lambda.APIGatewayEvents must be added to the project, otherwise the project will not compile. We do not include it by default in order to keep the Amazon.Lambda.Annotations library lightweight.

Product Compatible and additional computed target framework versions.
.NET net6.0 is compatible.  net6.0-android was computed.  net6.0-ios was computed.  net6.0-maccatalyst was computed.  net6.0-macos was computed.  net6.0-tvos was computed.  net6.0-windows was computed.  net7.0 was computed.  net7.0-android was computed.  net7.0-ios was computed.  net7.0-maccatalyst was computed.  net7.0-macos was computed.  net7.0-tvos was computed.  net7.0-windows was computed.  net8.0 was computed.  net8.0-android was computed.  net8.0-browser was computed.  net8.0-ios was computed.  net8.0-maccatalyst was computed.  net8.0-macos was computed.  net8.0-tvos was computed.  net8.0-windows was computed. 
Compatible target framework(s)
Included target framework(s) (in package)
Learn more about Target Frameworks and .NET Standard.

NuGet packages

This package is not used by any NuGet packages.

GitHub repositories (4)

Showing the top 4 popular GitHub repositories that depend on Amazon.Lambda.Annotations:

Repository Stars
aws/aws-lambda-dotnet
Libraries, samples and tools to help .NET Core developers develop AWS Lambda functions.
aws-samples/serverless-test-samples
This repository is designed to provide guidance for implementing comprehensive test suites for serverless applications.
Particular/docs.particular.net
All content for ParticularDocs
hlaueriksson/CommandQuery
Command Query Separation for 🌐ASP.NET Core ⚡AWS Lambda ⚡Azure Functions ⚡Google Cloud Functions
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